Over the last few weeks, I’ve noticed a considerable amount of attention focused on Generation Y from both the media and business world. The May 20 issue of Time Magazine led with a cover story labelling them the ‘Me, Me, Me’ generation: narcissistic, fame-obsessed, and self interested; Meanwhile PwC reported findings from a comprehensive Next Gen study of its Gen Y employees.

Despite the apparent interests of companies in integrating CSR with business strategy, however, this is rarely successfully carried out in practice. The importance of corporate leadership in reversing this trend cannot be overstated. Leaders are the driving force for change in any organization. A small but growing body of research is shedding light on how corporate leadership and corporate responsibility intersect, and the findings are intriguing.

The ability of CEOs to develop ‘superstar’ talent is the difference between success and failure in the business world, one of the UK’s leading sports executives has said in the build-up to an important new leadership summit in Dubai later this month. Mike Forde, former Director of Football Operations at Chelsea Football Club, says the race for talent has never been so critical as it is at present, and talent management is a primary responsibility of the CEO or key leaders, and not a HR function.

By Ron Thomas
“It is important for communities to educate our children for their future, not our past.” In a recent interview, Romain Dallemand, the superintendent of schools in Bibb County, Georgia, talked about how he came into the job last year with a bag of changes he calls “The Macon Miracle.” One of the tools in that tool kit was adding Chinese as a language requirement in his school district.